Wyze Porchcam Bird Feeder Disquise

This was inspired by another Wyzecam post from Firefighter922.

Materials:

Notes:

  • cut the wood to size and paint the outside part to better match the bird feeder
  • pop out one of the plastic window pieces, I used the vented side of the bird feeder for the camera, but may switch the camera to the other side of the feeder during the Winter.
  • I used two adhesive velcro buttons to help hold the camera base to the inside of the bird feeder. The camera’s magnetic base wasn’t strong enough to hold up the camera on the slippery painted feeder wall.
  • The front of the camera didn’t sit flush with the feeder wall, it leaned back a little, so I used a small piece of foam to push the camera front up against the feeder wall. It’s good and snug now.
  • the camera power cable is routed to the other side of the feeder (there’s two sides) over the separator panel and out the bottom opening.
  • the feeder was secured to the rack with a zip tie to keep the wind from moving it around.

This enclosure isn’t water proof, but the feeder sits on a shelving unit under my porch eave. The previous Wyzecam had been exposed outside since April 2018, but mounted up higher to the porch ceiling. It still works and has been moved to another location. Hopefully, this new camera will last another year in the bird feeder.

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Some more photos:

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Great Work!

Look’s amazing !!!

That is awesome.:+1:t2:

I bet you get a few birds looking at the lens.

Very creative!

This camera has yet to see activity around the lens from birds or insects, something that was experienced by the previous camera that was mounted to the porch ceiling directly above this cameras location. Maybe its because of the surrounding succulent plants or the bird feeder housing itself, but I’ve yet to get any false alerts from bird or insect activity.

Additionally, I don’t use the IR LED’s on the camera because they attracted insects at night. I’ve found the video quality to be much better with normal visible light illumination from my porch light and a backup 1200 lumen solar-powered LED motion sensing light.

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I never thought about turning the IR off, I’ll try it with all the moths that buzz the camera on my porch.