Wyze Lamp Socket; missed sale of at least one

We have a number of Wyze products and the lamp socket looked perfect for integrating our front porch light into our Wyze network, BUT requiring a V3 to be attached to the socket when we have NO NEED for a Wyzecam to be located/attached to this porch light means Wyze has missed at least one sale of a Wyze Lamp Socket.

p.s. New wall switch will likely not work either as porch light circuit is not conventionally wired (1920’s style; only one lead at switch.)

If it’s enclosed you could just use a Wyze (or other) smart bulb. I read today that the new socket isn’t even rated for outdoor use anyway (which seems ridiculous).

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As @Customer stated, try a Wyze bulb. I have 5 Color bulbs outside without any issues. 3 of them are in fully enclosed fixtures and 2 are in fixtures which are open at the bottom, these are on each side of my garage.

Been there for about a year or more and have had no issues at all.

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I’d like to add that, like @Customer and @spamoni4, I have regular Wyze smart bulbs in my outdoor porch light fixtures. They work great, and minimal risk of moisture since the fixtures are enclosed and under an overhang. Haven’t had a problem since I installed them (ordered when they were pre-order).

I’m going to upgrade to the lamp socket so I can FINALLY use V3 outdoors (as I had no way of running power to them until this lamp socket). I’ll find another use for those Wyze bulbs elsewhere in my house or keep them as backups.

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Two issues for our location and LED bulbs:

  1. Fixture is under porch overhang but open at the bottom, and fog is common so there is some dampness exposure.
  2. As mentioned, existing socket is not wired to modern standards (one side of its circuit goes directly to it, only the other side goes to its switch). LED bulbs do NOT like this wiring configuration, and remain on at low level even when switch is turned off (incandescent and fluorescent bulbs do not have this problem.)
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My fixtures are open at the bottom and we have very foggy mornings and evenings during various parts of the year (South Western Illinois). Unless there’s a substantial amount of water dripping onto the lightbulb you should have no problems.

But I understand the wiring issue. I would think the socket adapter would have the same issue as the bulbs with that type of wiring.

But, if you’re using smart bulbs or the socket adapter you’d want to have that switch on permanently anyway. There’s no reason to turn it off as once the switch is off, the smart features would no longer work.

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Same here I’ve had some on my front porch and back porch/ carport and they are fine. I’m in Mobile, Al and we have 75-90% humidity year round.

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This doesn’t exactly make sense to me. It sounds as if it’s not the switch or the fact that there is no neutral, but rather that you have a ground fault?

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I agree, there’s a wiring problem there. Even without a neutral if the hot line is switched there should be no voltage to the light. If there is, there’s got to be a ground fault as you mentioned or some other reason voltage is leaking to ground. The reason regular bulbs probably don’t show the problem, but LED’s do is the lower voltage requirement for LED vs a regular AC bulb. I would get that checked out because there’s likely voltage on the metal lamp fixture which could be a problem if touched, especially when wet.

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Well, if it really is 1920’s wiring, that’s basically cloth insulated wires on ceramic standoffs (knob and tube), so there’s a pretty good chance that there’s a path to ground somewhere.

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