Mail Box Sensor

I tried to convert a Sense sensor to work but ran into a host of problems that I didn’t have the patience to try to solve (although some others have been able to get to work). The biggest issue was voiding the warranty by extending the antenna because of range issues. Also, it would have to be rated for outdoor use as sometimes our mailbox can get stuffed full and the sensor would get knocked out of place if mounted inside (and signal loss on a metal box). Ring released on for $29. Should be easy for Wyze to come in way under that!

The Ring mailbox sensor is a good design that would make a good application specific product.

Here’s my Wyze mailbox sensor:


Yes, that’s from a V2 stuck to the back wall of my mailbox.

2 Likes

Yeah. My mailbox gets stuffed sometimes.


This was my mailbox last week when it didn’t get delivered until after 9pm. I submitted a complaint because there was a $2700 check mixed in with a poster tube.
If you look close you can see the magnet and the 3D printed case for the sensor I tried. Just too far away from Sense bridge.

1 Like

Well if you use a communal box you can put the Sensor on your Door When the main door opens the sensor will go off. If it is a personal box it is a bit difficult. You would have to probably use paper mache and Elmer’s glue to form a half dome pike so if the mail slides or if the mail mads hand touches it doesn’t get caught on the sensor. Or like a pyramid and mold it to the flat surface. You could 3D print a mold as well if you have access to a 3D printer. test it then sell it and have a side business for us non 3d printer people.

wow thats amazing. great job. Skies the limit!

Now all you need is a robot to pickup the mail or some kind of Train track rail that the Mail box post runs on to travel back into the house through its own door and then it waits for you to pick up the mail. press the button and it goes back outside.

Thank you. Here’s a little back story. The mailbox is built into a brick column at the sidewalk. When I built the column about eight years ago, I wanted to put some sort of mail detector in the box, but never got around to it. However, in prep for being able to add a sensor, when I built it, I put a piece of 1/2 inch conduit from the back wall of the mailbox down into the brick column. That was needed because the mailbox itself is completely encased in concrete. When I started getting a collection of Wyze cameras, I realized that I could easily put a camera in the back of the mailbox and feed the USB power cord down through the conduit. There is both power and a WiFi access point in the column.