How not to take out the trash

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Hey I got the keys to my Mom’s car I be over in a flash…LOL

(converted the format of the above video)

Looks like they hit a utility pedestal and missed the next one, Cable TV or Landline?

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Intoxication? Epilepsy? Teenager? What are the details here?

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Young woman texting and driving.

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She’s really lucky she only took out a couple of trash containers and a pedestal, There could have been kids riding on bikes or someone on the sidewalk.

Hopefully, she learned a lesson.

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I just do not understand why people would be so stupid as to text and drive

Yeah, I thought that might be the case. Teenagers especially cause a lot of accidents from distracted driving like this. Granted, adults with experience shouldn’t use their phones while driving either, but it’s much worse for newer young drivers.

New drivers have to drive using purely their actively conscious cerebrum (and that part of their brain isn’t even fully developed yet for teenagers, but that’s what’s required for this new driving activity), and the cerebrum has way fewer synapses and makes it impossible to do things very quickly or very well…new drivers (especially teenagers with undeveloped cerebrums) find it difficult to drive smoothly, and they make lots of errors and mistakes because of the lack of the number of available synapses which makes them work like the first generation computers in order to do it, all procedural computation and very limited resources and attention to spend on all the tons of things going on.

Whereas once we have driven for a while and gain enough experience our driving shifts to instead be being primarily run by the Cerebellum which has Purkinje cells that have exponentially more synapses (80,000 synapses compared to just the conscious part of the brain that has just a few each), and has huge improvement in motor control and paying attention to tons of things in an autopilot kind of way (you will check your mirrors and speed and all sorts of things fairly automatically, you aren’t constantly as jerky on the wheel and hitting brake-gas-brake-gas-brake-gas every few seconds, and forgetting your seatbelt and all sorts of things, much of it is just handled by the other part of your brain). Over time, experience driving transfers to the subconscious mind and neurons and we become way better at leveraging both parts of our brain while we drive.

Basically, Teenagers have to devote their driving to 100% procedural, computational, actively conscious driving (with the part of the brain that is less experienced and only partially developed [won’t fully develop until around age 25] and partially capable of this) while their executive function is still primarily run off the limbic system and emotion. For them, any distraction from total concentration on driving is a high risk disaster because their cerebellum biologically & literally can’t handle it all alone [very well]…but being mostly emotionally driven they want to believe they can.

Again, that’s not to say that adults should use their phones either. Just because experience eventually transfers to the cerebellum which can handle some things better and more safely, really safe driving requires both to function well. It’s just especially bad for Teenagers who don’t have enough experience to be able to get any help from their cerebellum for this.

Having said that, if my daughter did this, I’d consider getting her one of those apps that automatically locks her phone if the phone is ever moving faster than 15mph or something. Sucks to be a passenger, but better than her [or others] dying from a lack of delay of gratification skills.

Thanks for sharing, it was interesting to watch.