Enterprise Wifi Network Support

Back in early January we bought a Wyze Cam v2 with the idea that it was a quick camera we could setup for the occasional short term security situations we sometimes run into.

The original plan was that we connect it to our existing open network. Since the camera was only being plugged in at most a few times a year and we didn’t have any privacy concerns this seemed like the best option, however the choice Wyze made to remove open network support meant we couldn’t do that.

Then our network guy thought it would be possible to setup a hidden WPA2 network for the Wyze camera but discovered our APs only support WPA2 Enterprise passwords so that won’t work.

I’d really like to either see WPA2 Enterprise support using a Radius server or open network support returned as an unrecommended option (with a security vulnerability warning obviously). Any help on anything I might be overlooking would be appreciated.

Hi @LC-Security,

There is a #wishlist topic already asking to restore open network access here: Allow Unsecure WiFi Networks

Since you are asking for Enterprise support, we’re keeping this separate.

In the mean time, you can probably address your specific situation by using a mini travel router as an intermediate device. See the following Support article for more info:

Thanks for the reply but I don’t think your first link is right, it takes me to my profile.

Yay! My Network guy just walked in and he found a hidden way to turn on PSK for WPA2 on our APs so that it doesn’t require Enterprise security for the new SSID he created for me. So we have it working now! That said having Enterprise WiFi supported would still be a nice feature to support.

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Thanks. It was a cut and paste error on my part. I’ve fixed the link.

WPA2-PSK traffic can be decrypted if someone captures the traffic over the air and knows the PSK (Pre-Shared Key). As an enterprise wireless engineer, I strongly support this request to add WPA2-Enterprise support.

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I am in an area where the WiFi protocol is PEAP, therefore, there is no way to connect my devices as the protocol is not compatible with that of Wyze cams, it would be nice to choose the type of protocol, WPA, WPA2, etc to connect, is there a plan for this to be available? As a workaround, I connect one laptop as a hotspot and connect the devices but then again I would have to leave the laptop on and that is not feasible all the time.

Thanks for considering this wish,

Regards

I don’t believe Wyze is probably going to support PEAP. Rather than dedicating a laptop to this, you might want to consider getting a travel router to dedicate to this purpose such as this one:

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Thanks for that tip, unfortunately, that would not fit the bill for the following reason:
I receive my signal via wifi so there is no way to connect using the LAN;
I can on the cellphone create a hotspot which allows me to connect the Wyze devices requiring simple passwords, with the PEAP a username is required and it uses the SSID when it does not see a username which does not get authenticated.

Still looking for a workaround though.

Cheers

You don’t need a LAN connection for the travel router. The product I mentioned has what is called WISP mode. It connects to the internet via an “inbound” wifi signal and then creates its own separate “outbound” wifi network with separate authentication.

Here’s an article describing how this is used for connecting in hotels with a landing page or unsecured wifi:

Note that the travel router model in this article doesn’t support PEAP. However, the one I linked above does.

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Thanks for the clarification, will get that device and let you know the end result.

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It would be fantastic if Wyze would focus on Enterprise connectivity. I understand it’s not their highest priority… however, on behalf of ALL of the network engineers running the facilities you’re recommending folks walk into with wifi-bridges… please implement direct Enterprise support! These wifi bridges are bad news for most enterprise networks and will likely cause performance issues for others in the area. Wifi Channel space is at a premium in multi-AP grid layouts (read: large buildings with good coverage). Not to mention, many enterprise environments will flag your wireless bridge as a rouge device and start hunting it down to turn it off.

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